Abstracts of Research Papers, Cases and Presentations

ACT6 - Sixth Creative Teaching Conference
La Pedagogie Creative - La Pedagogia Creativa
Lucerne, Switzerland, January 3-6, 2003

FORGING INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES:
CONNECTING STUDENTS IN AN ONLINE GLOBAL CLASSROOM

Riad Ajami and Lydia Arledge
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA U.S.A
This paper describes the development and implementation of an online course designed to link students in exchange programs in three foreign countries with students in a traditional campus-based international marketing course. Partnered with the marketing students, the exchange students learned how to investigate foreign markets, provide competitor analyses, and prepare and conduct bicultural and bilingual negotiations. Through the use of information technology, the students were able to cooperatively work to link regional companies in North Carolina with potential trade partners in their countries of exchange. Fieldtrips and other experiential activities helped the students further explore government relationships with international businesses and economic and trade policies.

LEARNING JOURNALING

Patricia Brock
Pace University
NEW YORK, NEW YORK, U.S.A.
Student journal writing, a common assignment in current classrooms, creates a common concern for teachers: If journaling is an integral assignment, how should journals be assessed? The new concept of "Learning Journaling" presents guidelines to help teachers - from grade school through university settings - make decisions for fair and effective journaling assessment.

ADULT ESL IN HIGHER EDUCATION: BALANCING ACADEMIC LEARNING, SPEECH SCIENCE AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 

Lucia Buttaro
City University of New York at Kingsborough
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, U.S.A.
International students' difficulties understanding lectures in English are sometimes attributed to lack of familiarity with rhetorical structure rather than sentence-level misinterpretation, even when language proficiency seems adequate (Mason, 1994). Vollmer (2000) observed that unsuccessful students fail to notice how the details of a lecture fit together as points in an argument. Murphy (1996) has suggested that basing an English for academic purposes syllabus on sustained-content teaching provides important opportunities to practice "comprehending-to-learn academic content material as distinct from instruction in learning - to - comprehend" (p. 109). Murphy further notes that live delivery of academic lectures not only favors interaction but also simulates the type of give - and - take lecture format that international students struggle to cope with in college or university settings.

FROM NUMBER THEORY AND SOFTWARE DESIGN 
TO HOMOMORPHISM THEOREMS

Yuanqian Chen
Central Connnecticut State University
NEW BRITAIN, CONNNECTICUT, U.S.A.
Abstract unavailable

PROMOTING, DESIGNING AND TEACHING AN UNDERGRADUATE GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE ON THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT: A MANAGEMENT EDUCATOR'S PERSPECTIVE 

Audrey J. Cohen
Marymount Manhattan College
NEW YORK, NEW YORK, U.S.A.
Non-business majors received eighty percent of the bachelors degrees awarded in the U.S. in 1997-1998. Many of these graduates will develop management careers and make decisions affecting the natural environmental. Management educators can help prepare these students by collaborating with liberal arts colleagues to develop general education courses that include discussion of management responses to environmental issues. This paper highlights the challenges and rewards of promoting, designing and teaching such a course. Management educators who initiate similar courses will challenge prevailing practice, reach new and larger audiences, and evidence to the higher education community a commitment to the natural world.

SYNTHESIZE, ENERGIZE, AND GENERALIZE:
CAPSTONE EXPERIENCES IN LEADERSHIP EDUCATION

Stephen P. Hundley
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA, U.S.A.
An undergraduate program at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the Department of Organizational Leadership and Supervision (OLS) equips students with leadership skills, a technical concentration, and a broad-based general education foundation. As part of the degree program, students complete two senior-level capstone experiences that focus on professional development and research processes, respectively. This paper discusses the need for and purposes of capstones in leadership education; how capstones are used to demonstrate learning; and the ways that students apply the outcomes of the capstone experiences to their personal, academic, and professional lives.

IMPLEMENTING INNOVATIVE CLINICAL LEARNING EXPERIENCES INTO A LARGE-LECTURE UNDERGRADUATE MANAGEMENT COURSE: THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH FLORIDA CASE

Edward A. Johnson
Beryl A. Johnson

University of North Florida
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, U.S.A.
Undergraduate business education should incorporate more clinical learning experiences and provide more connection between business concepts and practices within the undergraduate learning environment. Although there are many barriers to successfully incorporating clinical learning experiences into an undergraduate business program, this paper discusses the design/implementation of an innovative undergraduate business education model that incorporates valuable clinical learning experiences into a large-lecture undergraduate course. The paper focuses on six specific clinical learning experiences (action-oriented workshops) that are integrated into the large-lecture management course. A description of these clinical experiences and an overall evaluation of effectiveness of this innovative educational model are provided.

THRESHOLDS IN ADULT PEDAGOGY: 
COOPERATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

Amelia Klein
Wheelock College
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A.
This session will explore approaches to building a classroom "community of learners." Adult learners are viewed as having multiple needs, which span the social, emotional, cultural, and cognitive domains. Principles of adult pedagogy will be applied to professional practice. Strategies that promote collaborative problem-solving and dialog, as well as professional competencies and skills, will be examined.

INTERNATIONAL MERGER & ACQUISITION AND COMPETITIVE 
ADVANTAGE: A CROSS CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE

Wen-Kuei Liang
Tatung University
TAIPEI, TAIWAN, R.O.C.
In an attempt to generate synergies, collectively through the integrations of resources and capabilities among firms from acquisition and/or merger, MNCs expect to enhance their competitive advantages eventually. In contrast to their wishful expectations, most of the time they not only be able to realize potential returns, but lock-in various valuable resources that could be profitably leveraged elsewhere, however. This study adopts both cultural dimensions of Hofstede and Trompenarrs to illustrate the relationships between international merger & acquisition (IMA) and firms' competitive advantages. Integrating theoretical groundings and experiences of high-tech companies from Taiwan, the research proposes a conceptual framework, propositions and finally advances implications for both theories and practices.

YOU'VE GOT TO SPEAK IT, TOUCH IT, ORGANIZE IT, AND APPLY IT TO LEARN IT: LAW STUDENT VOICES AND PEDAGOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON TEACHING AND LEARNING

Paula Lustbader
Seattle University School of Law
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, U.S.A.
This interactive session will use a video tape of diverse law students from 7 different U.S. law schools discussing their learning experience in law school as a spring board to explore methods that increase the effectiveness of the case method and to develop a pedagogical justification for employing those methods. As more teachers better understand student learning and expand their pedagogy, the learning experience of more students will be enhanced. Most importantly, all students will have the opportunity to reach their full potential. The objectives are as follows:
  • To provide teachers with ideas to enhance the use of the case method.
  • To provide pedagogical research that supports the use of these tools and the use of the case method.
  • To provide an interactive learning experience for participants.
  • To model the case method with a case method in point on effective teaching and learning.

USE OF THE PDA - ENHANCING THE CASE STUDY PEDAGOGY USING NEW TECHNOLOGY IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Louis C. Mancuso
Larry D. Smith

Charleston Southern University
SUMMERVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA, U.S.A.
Is the PDA (Personal Digital Assistant) poised to be the new technological darling on campuses? Universities are just beginning to require new students to have notebook computers to be used throughout their college careers. In addition, a few universities are requiring students to have PDA's as well. This paper will show how a small private university can employ PDAs' into an adult education program. A discussion will include how the university was convinced to use the PDA, techniques used in the case study method, assessment technology using the PDA, and the alleviation of faculty cognitive dissonance in the use of the PDA. Coupled with the discussion will be an electronic presentation using the PDA in a simulated case study. Initial results of the usage of the PDA for business case studies will be presented.

CASE STUDIES - THEY'RE NOT JUST FOR BUSINESS COURSES

R. Keith Martin
Fairfield University
FAIRFIELD, CONNECTICUT, U.S.A.
That case studies are applicable only for courses in business schools is a common assumption both inside and outside the academy. Actually, the use of cases has wide application not only in the curricula of the various professional schools, but also in a wide array of courses within the traditional arts and sciences programs. During this session the use of cases in many different academic venues will be explored.

THE FUTURES WHEEL: AN INNOVATIVE 
TOOL FOR DIVERSE SETTINGS

Pat McCallister
Eastern Illinois University
CHARLESTON, ILLINOIS, U.S.A.
The quantity of information available has increased tremendously in the last few years. Hence, professionals must sort, evaluate and make decisions with the vast information. The futures wheel is a tool that facilitates practical, yet flexible processing of information in addition to improving skills in inductive reasoning, critical thinking and prediction. This presentation will focus on: 1) the rationale behind the futures wheel, 2) provide examples of applications in diverse settings, 3) discuss use by individuals, groups, organizations, businesses or institutions with social, cultural, political, economical and education affiliations, and 4) initiate hands-on experience with the wheel.

EVALUATION OF THE LIVE CASE STUDY MODEL

Lorraine McKechnie
Ron Livingstone

Glasgow Caledonian University
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND
The Live Case Study model was introduced by the authors in Autumn 2001 and pioneered in Her Majesty's Prison Barlinnie, Scotland, UK.  This paper provides an overview of the Live Case Study model, which is an initiative in the development and pedagogical uses of Case Studies with postgraduate management students. The principal focus of the paper is on the presentation of the results of evaluating the first phase in the development and testing of the model. The paper also details the modifications introduced to refine and improve the model as a result of the tripartite involvement of key stakeholders in the Case Study i.e. Senior Prison Management, MBA Graduates and academic staff. Findings corroborate the Live Case Study framework as a generic model from which multiple benefits have been gained from involvement by diverse parties.

COLLABORATIVE ALLIANCES BETWEEN GOVERNMENT, ACADEMIA, AND INDUSTRY - SPECIAL PROJECTS FOR THE CLASSROOM

Francine Newth
Providence College
PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND, U.S.A.
Abstract unavailable.

USING CASES AND APPLICATIONS 
IN THE TEACHING OF FRENCH CULTURE

Anthony Sallustio
Pace University
NEW YORK, NEW YORK, U.S.A.
This presentation will focus on a methodology for teaching French culture that requires students to apply cultural concepts and factual material learned from readings and videos to practical situations that require an analysis and appreciation of the mindset of the French people and the cultural trove of their country. The course design on which the study is based, can be either on-line or web assisted with several class meetings. 

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